Umbrella Final Agreement Yukon

While the Umbrella Final Agreement provides a framework within which each of the fourteen Yukon First Nations will enter into a final claims settlement agreement, all UFA provisions are part of any First Nation Final Agreement (FNFA). The final agreements contain the entire text of Umbrella`s final agreement, with the addition of specific provisions applicable to each First Nation. Looking ahead, Canada`s commitment to cooperate on a nation-to-nation basis with Yukon First Nation governments as well as the Council of Yukon First Nations and the Government of Yukon to recognize and implement Indigenous rights. Only in real partnership will we realize the visions, hopes and dreams presented in Together Today for Our Children Tomorrow and reflected in subsequent agreements. This decision highlights the CSSE`s compliance with the terms of modern contracts and its role in respecting the rights of First Nations to participate meaningfully in the land use planning processes prescribed by these contracts. While governments generally have the power of final decision-making, this power cannot be used to thwart the agreed process that leads to that decision. Both parties, First Nations and governments, should conscientiously and in good faith advance their contractual rights. These behavioral expectations are consistent with the positive and mutually respectful long-term relationship, which aims to promote modern contracts. In this sense, CSC has once again demonstrated its commitment to imposing processes as a means of reconciliation between the Crown and Aboriginal people in Canada. December 1, 2017 in the First Nations of Nacho Nyak Dun v. Yukon (Nacho Nyak Dun), the Supreme Court of Canada (CSC) has overturned a decision by the Government of Yukon to open the peel watershed to development and significantly amend the final recommended plan of the Peel Watershed Planning Commission (Commission). CSC has decided that the agreements with a number of First Nations that have enabled the Commission and provide for the land use planning process have not allowed Yukon to make such dramatic changes to the Commission`s plan. The current trial began in 1973 with the publication of Together Today For our Children Tomorrow by Chief Elijah Smith.

Negotiations took place in the late 1970s and early 1980s and culminated in a deal that was ultimately rejected. Negotiations resumed in the late 1980s and culminated in the Umbrella Final Agreement (UFA) in 1990. The UFA is used as a framework or model for individual agreements with each of the fourteen federally recognized Yukon First Nations. It was signed in 1993 and the first four First Nations ratified their Focal Claims Agreements in 1995. To date (January 2016), eleven of the fourteen First Nations have signed and ratified an agreement. Currently, La Rivière Blanche First Nation, Liard First Nation and Ross River Dena Council are not negotiating. They remain Indian bands under the Federal Indian Act. [2] In applying these principles to the case, CSC concluded that the Government of Yukon could not unilaterally change the plan; it was only able to make minor or partial changes based on the amendments it had previously proposed or in response to changing circumstances.. . . .